Why Should I Pair my Business Succession and Estate Planning? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

A successful business exit plan can accomplish three important objectives for a business owner: (i) financial security because the business sale or transfer provides income that the owner and owner’s family will need after the owner’s exit; (ii) the right person where the business owner names his or her successor; and (iii) income-tax minimization.

Likewise, a successful estate plan achieves three important personal goals: (i) financial security for the decedent’s heirs; (ii) the decedent (not the state) chooses who receives his or her estate assets; and (iii) estate-tax minimization.

Business owners will realize that the two processes have the same goals. Therefore, they can leverage their time and money and develop their exit plans into the design of their estate plans. The Phoenix Business Journal’s recent article “Which comes first for Arizona business owners: estate planning or exit planning?” explains that considering exit and estate planning together, lets a business owner ask questions to bring their entire picture into focus. Here are some questions to consider:

  1. If a business owner doesn’t leave her business on the planned business exit date, how will she provide her family with the same income stream they would’ve enjoyed if she had?
  2. How can a business owner be certain that her business retains its previously determined value?
  3. Regardless of whether an owner’s exit plan involves transferring part of the business to her children, does her estate plan reflect and implement her wishes, if she doesn’t survive?
  4. If an owner dies before leaving the business, can she be certain that her family will still get the full value of the business?

Another goal of the exit planning process is to protect assets from creditors during an owner’s lifetime and to minimize tax consequences upon a transfer of ownership.

Because planning exits from both business and life are based on the same premises, it can be relatively easy to develop a consistent outcome. There isn’t only one correct answer to the “estate or exit planning” question. A business owner must act on both fronts since a failure to act in either case creates ongoing issues for owners and for their businesses and families.

Reference: Phoenix Business Journal (October 8, 2019) “Which comes first for Arizona business owners: estate planning or exit planning?”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How Much Will I Really Spend in Retirement? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

People are living longer today compared to previous generations. This means that their retirement savings need to last longer. As a result, you’ll need to be certain that you’re calculating your retirement spending accurately.

Kiplinger’s recent article, “Planning for Retirement? You’re Probably Underestimating Your Spending,” explains that general figures and trends don’t consider a person’s health and many other factors. Still, you should anticipate a lengthy retirement, which makes it even more critical to understand your cash flow and break out your expenses.

It’s not uncommon for people to totally underestimate their post-retirement spending. They don’t see the many additional expenses they’ll incur after ending their employment or selling their business. The common notion is that as you get older, you spend less. However, there are new expenses that come with retirement and current costs that you may not be accounting for.

Let’s look at the four main types of expenses that prospective or new retirees need to plan when creating a budget. Educating yourself in these areas will help to have a comfortable retirement.

  1. Formerly business-subsidized expenses. For many, the job provides more than a salary. It can include health benefits, cell phones and health club memberships. To avoid some surprise when you retire, make a list of the expenses that are now covered by your employer or business. Some you might be able to do without, while others may be a necessity in retirement.
  2. Overlooked expenses. Many people do the majority of their primary spending on one credit card. However, when they estimate their spending for retirement, they forget about spending on other credit cards and regular services and charges that may be paid for by cash or check, such as landscaping, housekeeping and real estate taxes. Prior to retirement, go through all your expenses and how they’re being paid. This should help flesh out a thorough understanding of your spending.
  3. Health care expenses. Even if you hit retirement without a major accident or illness, you’re still probably going to spend a good portion of your income to stay that way. A recent study found that a healthy male-female couple retiring at 65 in 2019 can expect to spend $285,000 on health care over their retirement years. Medicare begins at 65 and covers many expenses, but there are many common health care costs that are not covered, such as dental and vision services, prescription drugs (unless you buy a supplemental plan, such as Part D), and long-term care. Out-of-pocket costs can also shoot up if a senior has a serious or chronic disease, like a heart condition.
  4. Recurring non-recurring expenses. You may get a new car or need a major repair in your house. These are considered non-recurring expenses you commit to sparingly or just once in your life. However, big purchases and unexpected costs occur more often than you’d imagine. It’s a good practice to plan for at least one “one-time purchase” each year to cover these unanticipated bills.

Reference: Kiplinger (October 3, 2019) “Planning for Retirement? You’re Probably Underestimating Your Spending”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How to Enjoy Life After Retirement – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

By the time they reach retirement age, some people are so burned out, bitter, or damaged that they feel incapable of experiencing joy or happiness. After a lifetime of hard work, they are miserable. For many people, the only thing they enjoyed in life was their career. When they stop working, they feel lost and adrift. If you are feeling any of these things, you could use a roadmap on how to enjoy life after retiring.

You have spent the last several decades working to provide for and take care of yourself and your family. The vast majority of your waking hours were spent doing what needed to get done with little time, money, or energy left for doing what you wanted to do.

You might have had to deal with difficult bosses, marital troubles and financial crises. When you look back on your working life, you might feel dissatisfied with the compensation you received for your labors.

Shifting Your Focus

Continuing to approach life the same way you did during your career, might not bring you the happiness you would like in retirement. People who find fulfillment in their golden years often shift their focus from the concerns of making a living and raising a family to exploring other dimensions of life.

Regardless of how well you took care of yourself and how blessed you are with good health, eventually, your body will begin to lose strength and endurance. You can consider this reality a loss or a natural process.

Many people pay more attention to their spirituality or religion after retirement. They think about what matters and step away from things that do not bring them joy. Decluttering your life can be a lot like cleaning out a closet. You get rid of things you no longer need or want and unearth things you forgot were there.

It can be liberating to get away from toxic co-workers who brought you years of stress. You can replace them by looking up old friends or making new ones.

If you feel useless or not needed, you will not have fulfillment. After your career is behind you, it can be hard to figure out who you are and what you can contribute to society.

Finding a type of volunteer work can make you feel valuable and happy. Some people get such a rush from volunteering that they commit to it more than they should. When this happens, the person becomes unhappy and wonders what else to try, thinking that helping others made the volunteer miserable. In reality, being overscheduled made him unhappy. Simply cut back on your activities, until you find the right pace for you.

Everyone has valuable skills to teach others. If you can read, draw, play chess, sew, bake, create a budget, plant a garden, or any other task, someone out there wants to learn what you know. You do not need a Ph.D. to teach others useful life skills.

Be sure to give yourself the free time and solitude you want. Balance those aspects with stimulating social activities to stay connected and keep your brain healthy. You have earned this time, now enjoy it.

References: HuffPost. “How To Find Fulfillment In Life After Retirement.” (accessed October 9, 2019) https://www.huffpost.com/entry/how-to-find-fulfillment-i_b_11887068

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What Do I Do With an Inherited IRA? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

When a family member dies and you discover you’re the beneficiary of a retirement account, you’ll need to eventually make decisions about how to handle the money in the IRA that you will be inheriting.

Forbes’ recent article, “What You Need To Know About Inheriting An IRA,” says that being proactive and making informed decisions can help you reach your personal financial goals much more quickly and efficiently. However, the wrong choices may result in you forfeiting a big chunk of your inheritance to taxes and perhaps IRS penalties.

Assets transferred to a beneficiary aren’t required to go through probate. This includes retirement accounts like a 401(k), IRA, SEP-IRA and a Cash Balance Pension Plan. Here is some information on what you need to know, if you find yourself inheriting a beneficiary IRA.

Inheriting an IRA from a Spouse. The surviving spouse has three options when inheriting an IRA. You can simply withdraw the money, but you’ll pay significant taxes. The other options are more practical. You can remain as the beneficiary of the existing IRA or move the assets to a retirement account in your name. Most people just move the money into an IRA in their own name. If you’re planning on using the money now, leave it in a beneficiary IRA. You must comply with the same rules as children, siblings or other named beneficiaries, when making a withdrawal from the account. You can avoid the 10% penalty, but not taxation of withdrawals.

Inheriting an IRA from a Non-Spouse. You won’t be able to transfer this money into your own retirement account in your name alone. To keep the tax benefits of the account, you will need to create an Inherited IRA For Benefit of (FBO) your name. Then you can transfer assets from the original account to your beneficiary IRA. You won’t be able to make new contributions to an Inherited IRA. Regardless of your age, you’ll need to begin taking Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from the new account by December 31st of the year following the original owner’s death.

The Three Distribution Options for a Non-Spouse Inherited IRA. Inherited IRAs come with a few options for distributions. You can take a lump-sum distribution. You’ll owe taxes on the entire amount, but there won’t be a 10% penalty. Next, you can take distributions from an Inherited IRA with the five-year distribution method, which will help you avoid RMDs each year on your Inherited IRA. However, you’ll need to have removed all of the money from the Inherited IRA by the end of five years.

For most people, the most tax-efficient option is to set up minimum withdrawals based on your own life expectancy. If the original owner was older than you, your required withdrawals would be based on the IRS Single Life Expectancy Table for Inherited IRAs. Going with this option, lets you take a lump sum later or withdraw all the money over five years if you want to in the future. Most of us want to enjoy tax deferral within the inherited IRA for as long as permitted under IRS rules. Spouses who inherit IRAs also have an advantage when it comes to required minimum distributions on beneficiary IRAs: they can base the RMD on their own age or their deceased spouse’s age.

When an Inherited IRA has Multiple Beneficiaries. If this is the case, each person must create his or her own inherited IRA account. The RMDs will be unique for each new account based on that beneficiary’s age. The big exception is when the assets haven’t been separated by the December 31st deadline. In that case, the RMDs will be based on the oldest beneficiaries’ age and will be based on this until the funds are eventually distributed into each beneficiary’s own accounts.

Inherited Roth IRAs. A Roth IRA isn’t subject to required minimum distributions for the original account owner. When a surviving spouse inherits a ROTH IRA, he or she doesn’t have to take RMDs, assuming they retitle the account or transfer the funds into an existing Roth in their own name. However, the rules are not the same for non-spouse beneficiaries who inherit a Roth. They must take distributions from the Roth IRA they inherit using one of the three methods described above (a lump sum, The Five-Year Rule, or life expectancy). If the money has been in the Roth for at least five years, withdrawal from the inherited ROTH IRA will be tax-free. This is why inheriting money in a Roth is better than the same amount in an inherited Traditional IRA or 401(k).

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about an Inherited IRA. The rules can be confusing, and the penalties can be costly.

Reference: Forbes (September 19, 2019) “What You Need To Know About Inheriting An IRA”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How to Prevent The Top Six Retirement Planning Mistakes – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

One of the biggest mistakes people make with their retirement, is not realizing what they don’t know, says the Chicago Sun-Times in the article “The 6 biggest retirement mistakes—and how you can avoid them.” By misunderstanding how Social Security works, underestimating life expectancies or failing to plan for big expenses, like long-term care or taxes, people put themselves and their families in financial binds.

These are not the people who make an effort to educate themselves. They are sure they know what’s what—until they realize they don’t. Most people don’t seek out objective advice before they retire. They wing it, hoping things will work out. Often, they don’t.

Retirement is complicated. Here are the top six most common mistakes:

Expecting to die young. If you die young, you have fewer worries about retirement funds. Live a long life and you could easily outlive your retirement savings. One smart move is to wait to collect Social Security as long as possible. Each year you put it off from age 62 to 70, increases your benefit by 7-8 percent.

Ignoring your spouse’s needs. One of you will die first. When that happens, one of your Social Security checks goes away. The survivor will need to get by on only one check. This is why it is vital to maximize the survivor benefit by having the higher earner delay filing for Social Security as long as possible.  Married people who receive a pension, should consider a “joint and survivor” option that lets payments continue for both lives.

Bringing debt into retirement If you’re rich, debt may not be a big deal. You have plenty of income to make payments. Your investments may be earning more than you are paying in interest payments. However, if you are not rich, are you pulling too much from your savings to pay down the debt? This would increase the chances you’ll run out of money. If you take big withdrawals from retirement accounts, it could push you into a higher tax bracket and increase your Medicare premium. Try to get rid of your debt before retiring. However, be careful about tapping retirement accounts to pay off big debts, like a home mortgage.

Neglecting to plan for long-term care. Someone turning 65 today has a 70 percent chance of needing help with daily living tasks, like bathing, eating or dressing. Family and friends may be willing to help, but about half will need long-term care at a cost of $250,000 a year or more. Long-term care insurance is the most obvious solution. However, if you didn’t purchase it when you were healthy, you may need to earmark certain investments, or consider tapping your home equity to pay for this cost.

Thinking you’ll just keep working. About half of retirees report leaving the workforce earlier than they had planned. Most retire because they lose their jobs and cannot find a replacement job or can’t find one at the same income level as their previous job. Others retire because of ill health or the need to stop working to care for a loved one. Working longer can help you make up for not saving enough, but don’t count on it.

Putting off retirement too long. Consider time, health and energy as finite resources. Spend the time and money to speak with professionals, including an estate planning attorney and a financial advisor to determine when you can retire, prepare an estate plan and enjoy retirement.

Reference: Chicago Sun-Times (September 23, 2019) “The 6 biggest retirement mistakes—and how you can avoid them.”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How Can I Plan for Medical Expenses in Retirement? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Healthcare can be one of the biggest expenses in retirement.

Fidelity Investments found that a 65-year-old newly retired couple will need $285,000 for medical expenses in retirement. That doesn’t include the annual cost of long-term care. In 2018, that expense ran from $18,720 for adult day care services to $100,375 for a private room in a nursing home, according to Investopedia’s recent article, “How to Plan for Medical Expenses in Retirement.”

Despite saving and preparing for retirement their entire lives, many retirees aren’t mentally or financially prepared for these types of expenses. A survey by HSA Bank found that 67% of adults 65 and older thought that they’d need less than $100,000 for healthcare. However, Fidelity calculated that males 65 and older will need $133,000—and females, $147,000—to pay for healthcare in retirement.

There are two important numbers for healthcare expenses in retirement: how much money is coming in and how much is going out. A typical person in their 60s has an estimated median savings of $172,000. On average, those 65 and older spend $3,800 per month, but Social Security only replaces about 40% of their working-life income.

Medicare can pay for some healthcare spending in retirement. However, there are some limitations. If a senior doesn’t have a Part D prescription drug policy, Medicare won’t cover medications. Medicare Parts A and B won’t cover dental and vision care, but Medicare Advantage plans typically do. Medicare also doesn’t offer coverage for long-term care. Medicare Advantage plans are offered through private insurers.

There are two ways pre-retirees can create a safety net for healthcare spending when they retire. One way is with a Health Savings Account (HSA). HSAs are available with high-deductible health plans and offer three tax advantages: (i) deductible contributions; (ii) tax-deferred growth; and (iii) tax-free withdrawals for qualified medical expenses. HSA funds can be used to pay for certain medical premiums, like Medicare premiums and long-term care insurance premiums. If you’re in your 50s, you can still maximize these plans by taking advantage of catch-up contributions and employer contributions. However, those already enrolled in Medicare can’t make new contributions to an HSA.

You can also buy long-term care insurance to fill the gap left by Medicare. This policy can pay a monthly benefit toward long-term care for a two-to three-year period.

Healthcare spending can easily take a big bite out of a retirement budget. Estimate your costs and design a strategy for spending to help preserve more retirement assets for other expenses.

Reference: Investopedia (June 25, 2019) “How to Plan for Medical Expenses in Retirement”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Do You Have to Relocate For Retirement? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Whether to relocate for retirement is a difficult question for some people and a snap to answer for others. Relocating in retirement, says The Motley Fool in the article “4 Reasons to Relocate in Retirement,” can make for a far more relaxed, financially easier lifestyle.

Take a look at these four reasons and see how they line up with your current and future living situation.

It’s Expensive to Live Where You Are. If you live in a city like New York, San Francisco, Chicago or Los Angeles, you know about the high cost of living. Food, gas, and housing are just more expensive. While living in an expensive city usually means your paycheck is also high, once you stop working, that higher cost may no longer be affordable. If you can’t live without the amenities of a big city, consider a neighborhood nearby where you can easily access the world-class museums, theater, medical care, etc., but costs are a little lower.

Local and state taxes are high. People who live in high tax states know who they are. Taxes take an even bigger bite out of your budget at retirement. You will have income from Social Security and retirement savings or maybe a part-time job or a business. However, the less taxes you have to pay, the more money you’ll keep.

Property taxes can be a problem, even if you enter retirement with a paid-off mortgage. When you are on a fixed income, high property taxes are a problem. Moving somewhere with lower property taxes could help your fixed income stretch further.

You live in a state that taxes your Social Security benefits. Most states do not tax Social Security benefits, but there are 13 that do. The good news is that some of them offer exemptions for low-income to middle-income households, so you may be able to avoid these taxes. Some also offer a far lower cost of living than others, so that should be only one factor in your decision. Here are the states:

Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia.

You live in a place where you must have a car. The annual cost of car ownership is estimated at $8,849 on average, according to AAA. If you live in a walkable city, or one with good public transportation, you could save a fair amount of money. Living somewhere walkable will also keep you moving as you age, which is a good thing. At some point, there comes a time when it is necessary to hand over the keys. Losing your independence because there is no public transportation, is a difficult transition.

The idea of packing up and moving from a community where you have friends and family is not an easy one. However, the idea of having more money to enjoy your retirement years may make it worthwhile. Take your time considering how you’ll manage where you are and what you could do in a less expensive location.

Reference: The Motley Fool (Sep. 1, 2019) “4 Reasons to Relocate in Retirement”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How to Live a Full Life throughout Retirement – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

If you don’t have a personal plan for yourself, you may wish you had given it some thought if you come to an age and stage where other people want to make decisions on your behalf.

There are many choices to be made before, during and after retirement, but without a clear picture of what you want, it’s easy to get sidetracked. This message from The Press-Enterprise is very clear in the article “Aging seniors: Make decisions before someone makes them for you.”

Here are some of the choices you’ll face:

Where to live. Waiting to move to a location you want to live in early on could make it difficult or impossible for you to move there. Do you want to stay in an area where you have friends and belong to social and civic circles?

Do you want to relocate to live closer to family members? What will you do if you move and then learn that your family’s life is busy and you don’t see them very often? Be prepared for that scenario.

What do you like to do? If you visited Arizona or Texas and loved those places, do you want to move there for recreational activities or climate? If you have more time for hobbies and interests, you may be able to fulfill those dreams.

Moving also needs to take into account taxes, sales taxes, inheritance taxes and property taxes.

What kind of living space do you want? If you prefer to live in your own home, that raises questions. Will the house be safe as you age? Does the home have stairs? Are the hallways wide enough for a wheelchair? Do you have enough assets to support the house’s upkeep, make repairs and any major fixes? Will you take care of the house, or have to hire someone to maintain it? Finally, if you live with a spouse or a partner and that person dies, will you be able to manage the house on your own?

If a personal plan isn’t made now, you might regret it when other people are making choices for you.

Do you have a transportation plan? At some point, you will likely have to give up the keys to the car. How will you get around? If you live in a place with adequate buses, subways or taxis, you’ll be able to remain independent.

Taking care of yourself. The idea of not being able to take care of ourselves is not a happy one. At some point in life, we have to accept the fact that we’ll need care. As we age, it takes effort to enjoy socialization and meals and planned activities become very important. Does that include adult day care, a Continuing Care Retirement Community or assisted living?

Don’t be afraid to look into the future. By thinking about what you want and planning in advance, you are more likely to enjoy your retirement life.

Reference: The Press Enterprise (Aug. 31, 2019) “Aging seniors: Make decisions before someone makes them for you.”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What You Need to Know About Continuing Care Retirement Communities – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

With all the different types of residential options for seniors today, it is easy to get confused by the terminology. If you are trying to decide which choice is right for you or your loved one, you need to evaluate several kinds of arrangements. Here is what you need to know about continuing care retirement communities.

A continuing care retirement community offers a continuum of care, from independent living for people who need no assistance, to assisted living that offers some services, to nursing home care that provides skilled nursing care. A person or couple usually move into the level they need with the option to move to either more independence or more services as their needs change.

The benefit of a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) is you do not have to move to a different facility when you need more medical attention or if your health improves. You would have to move to a different part of the community that is usually in a separate building. However, all levels of care are at one campus or physical location.

The drawbacks of CCRC include:

  • These facilities tend to be more expensive than stand-alone centers. There is usually a sizeable entrance fee, ranging from $10,000 to $500,000.
  • The monthly expenses of living in a CCRC make these facilities out of range for low-income and most middle-income seniors. On top of the rent, there is a monthly maintenance fee that can range from $200 to more than $2,000.
  • There might not be a vacancy in the section to which you want to move, so you might have to go on a waiting list or move out of the CCRC to get the level of care you need. If you move out, you can lose the entrance fee you paid.
  • Usually, you do not own the place where you live, even though you might pay more than the market value of the building.

On the other hand, CCRCs have advantages, like:

  • A broader range of activities and services than stand-alone facilities.
  • Getting to stay close to the friends you have at the CCRC when your needs change.
  • More options for independent living, like apartments, houses, duplexes and townhomes.
  • The CCRC arrangement creates a social network and helps residents get through grief when a spouse passes. Residents of CCRCs tend to have less social isolation and higher activity levels as widows or widowers than people who live in single-family homes that are not part of a CCRC.
  • Because CCRCs have so many ongoing activities and the facilities include a range of opportunities for physical exercise, like swimming, yoga, tennis, golf, walking and dance, seniors in these communities tend to stay healthy and socially engaged.
  • Many CCRCs have barbers, hairdressers, grocery stores, coffee shops and retail shops onsite for the convenience of residents.
  • You can tailor your services to your desires. One resident might only want lawn care and snow removal. Another person might want housekeeping, meal preparation and transportation.

Make sure that you get detailed written information about all the costs for each service the CCRC offers and for all levels of care. Get the facility to tell you in writing what happens to your entrance fee, if you move from the facility. Compare at least three CCRC developments if you decide that a CCRC is the option you prefer and can afford.

Reference: A Place for Mom. “Continuing Care Retirement Communities.” (accessed August 21, 2019) https://www.aplaceformom.com/planning-and-advice/articles/continuing-care-retirement-communities

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Planning for the Unexpected – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

A woman was not notified when her elderly mother had fallen and hurt herself.  Sadly, this is not an unusual situation.

The daughter spoke with her mother once or twice a week, and the fall happened just after their last conversation. She dropped what she was doing and drove to the hospital, according to the article “Parents” in BusinessWest.com. At the hospital, she was worried that her mother was suffering from more than fractures, as her mother was disoriented because of the pain medications.

The conversation with her brother and mother about why she wasn’t notified immediately was frustrating. They “didn’t want to worry her.” She was worried, and not just about her mother’s well-being, but about her finances, and whether any plans were in place for this situation.

Her brother was a retired comptroller, and she thought that as a former financial professional, he would have taken care of everything. That was not the case.

Despite his professional career, the brother had never had “the talk” with his mother about money. No one knew if she had an estate plan, and if she did, where the documents were located.

All too often, families discover that no planning has taken place during an emergency.

The conversation took place in the hospital, when the siblings learned that documents had never been updated after their father had passed—more than 20 years earlier! The attorney who prepared the documents had retired long ago. The originals? Mom had no idea. The names of her banks and financial institutions had changed so many times over the years, that she wasn’t even sure where her money was.

For this family, the story had a happy ending. Once the mother got out of the hospital, the family made an appointment to meet with an estate planning attorney to get all of her estate planning and elder law planning completed. In addition, the family updated beneficiaries on life insurance and retirement accounts, which are now set to avoid probate.

Both siblings have a list of their mother’s assets, account numbers, credit card information and what’s more, they are tracking the accounts to ensure that any sort of questionable transactions are reviewed quickly. They finally have a clear picture of their mother’s expenses, assets and income.

If your family’s situation is closer to the start of the story than the end, it’s time to contact a qualified estate planning attorney who is licensed to practice in your state and have all the necessary preparation done. Don’t wait until you’re uncovering family mysteries in the hospital.

Reference: BusinessWest.com (Aug. 1, 2019) “Parents”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

For Immediate Release

Contact: Jane Frankel Sims

410-828-7775

Contact: Frank Campbell

410-263-1667

Sims & Campbell Estates and Trusts

Frankel Sims Law and Holden & Campbell
Merge to Form Sims & Campbell

Firm will offer comprehensive Trusts & Estates services through offices in Towson and Annapolis

TOWSON, Md. (April 26,2019)  Frankel Sims Law and Holden & Campbell have jointly announced the merger of their firms to create a boutique Trusts & Estates law firm providing comprehensive services in the fields of Estate Planning, Estate Administration, Trust Administration and Charitable Giving. The combined firm will be named Sims & Campbell and have offices in Towson, Md. and Annapolis, Md.  Jane Frankel Sims and Frank Campbell will lead and hold equal ownership stakes in the firm.

Sims & Campbell will have 9 attorneys and 15 legal professionals that handle every facet of estate and wealth transfer planning, including wills, revocable living trusts, irrevocable trusts, estate and gift tax advice, and charitable giving strategies.  The firm will focus solely on Trusts & Estates but will serve a wide range of clients, from young families with modest resources to ultra-high net worth individuals.  This allows clients to remain with the firm as their level of wealth and the complexity of related estate and tax implications change over time. 

“By joining forces, we have expanded our footprint to conveniently serve clients in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia” said Jane Frankel Sims.  We are seeing some of the greatest wealth transfer in our country’s history, and we want to continue to be on the leading edge of helping our clients maintain and enhance their family’s wealth.  In addition, we aim to serve our clients for years to come, and the new firm structure will allow Sims & Campbell to thrive even after Frank and I have retired.”    

“Jane and I have always admired each other’s firms and recognized the need to provide even greater depth and breadth of focused expertise to help families amass and protect their wealth from generation to generation,” said Frank Campbell.  “Now we have even greater capabilities to make a real difference for our clients.” 

The Sims & Campbell Towson office is located at 500 York Road, on the corner of York Road and Pennsylvania Avenue in the heart of Towson.  The Annapolis office is currently located at 716 Melvin Avenue, and is moving to 181 Truman Parkway in August, 2019.  For more information, visit www.simscampbell.law.