What is a Life Estate? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

A life estate is a type of property ownership that divides the control and ownership of a property. The person who creates the life estate for their home and assets is known as the “life tenant.” While a tenant retains control of the property, he or she shares ownership during their lifetime with the remainderman (the estate’s heir).

Quicken Loans’ recent article entitled “What Is A Life Estate And What Property Rights Does It Confer?” explains that while the life tenant lives, they’re in control of the property in all respects, except they can’t sell or encumber the property without the consent of the remaindermen. After the life tenant passes away, the remainderman inherits the property and avoids probate. This is a popular estate planning tool that automatically transfers ownership at the life tenant’s death to their heirs.

The life estate deed shows the terms of the life estate. Upon the death of the life tenant, the heir must only provide the death certificate to the county clerk to assume total ownership of the property.

Medicaid can play an essential role in many older adults’ lives, giving them the financial support needed for nursing facilities, home health care and more. However, the government considers your assets when calculating Medicaid eligibility. As a result, owning a home – or selling it and keeping the proceeds – could impact those benefits. When determining your eligibility for Medicaid, most states will use a five-year look-back period. This means they will total up all the assets you’ve held, sold, or transferred over the last five years. If the value of these assets passes above a certain threshold, you’ll likely be ineligible for Medicaid assistance.

However, a life estate can help elderly property owners avoid selling their home to pay for nursing home expenses. If your life estate deed was established more than five years before you first apply for benefits, the homeownership transfer would not count against you for Medicaid eligibility purposes.

To ensure you’re correctly navigating qualifying for Medicaid, it’s smart to discuss your situation with an attorney specializing in Medicaid issues.

Reference: Quicken Loans (Aug. 9, 2022) “What Is A Life Estate And What Property Rights Does It Confer?”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What Should I Know About Long-Term Care? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Long-term care insurance is a specialty type of insurance that helps pay for costs that are typically connected with long-term care. This can include items such as care given in a hospital, nursing home services, medical services provided in your home and treatment for dementia.

WGN’s recent article entitled “10 Crucial Things to Know about Long-Term Care“ looks at these important items.

  1. The Biggest Financial Threat. The most significant threat to your financial nest egg is long-term care. About 70% of people over 65 will need some kind of long-term care during their life. The national average for home health care services is $16,743 per month. However, there are ways to manage this without buying a traditional long-term care insurance policy where “you use it or lose it.”
  2. Long-Term Care Insurance is Really “Lifestyle” Insurance. It’s NOT nursing home insurance.
  3. Reverse Mortgages. These have become a popular and accepted way of paying for expenses, including the cost of long-term care. Reverse mortgages are designed to keep seniors at home longer. A reverse mortgage can pay for in-home care, home repair, home modification and other needs.
  4. Using Medicaid to Pay for Long-Term Care. This should be a last resort to pay for long-term care, but it also may be the only way to protect family assets. Medicaid will pay for long-term care, but certain criteria must be satisfied. Talk to an elder law attorney before applying for Medicaid.
  5. Important Considerations When Selecting a Long-Term Care Plan. Four things to consider: (i) go with a company with an AM BEST rating of A+ or better; (ii) the assets of the insurance company should be in the billions; (iii) some long-term care insurers will allow for group discounts through employers, or “affinity” group discounts through a local organization; and (iv) the tax advantages for tax-qualified long-term care insurance plans. At the federal level, premiums for long-term care insurance fall into the “medical expense” category. On the state level, 26 states offer some form of deduction or tax credit for long-term care insurance premiums.
  6. The Annuity-Based Long-Term Care & The Pension Protection Act. In 2006, this law was enacted to permit those with annuity contracts to have long-term care riders with special tax advantages. The Act allows the cash value of annuity contracts to be used to pay premiums on long-term care contracts.
  7. Asset-Based Long-Term Care Solutions. The best planning approach for those who choose to self-insure is to “invest” some of their legacy assets so the assets can be worth as much as possible whenever they may be needed to pay for care. If unneeded, the money would then pass to the intended heirs, with no “use it or lose it” issues as with conventional long-term care insurance.
  8. Long-Term Care Strategy Using IRA Money. Most people use their IRA to supplement retirement. However, sometimes waiting until age 72 when mandatory required minimum distribution rules apply, some people have instead opted to take a portion of their IRA and fund an IRA-based annuity which then systematically funds a 20-pay life insurance plan with long-term care features. This type of IRA-based long-term care policy is unique in the sense that it starts out as an IRA annuity policy, also known as a tax-qualified annuity, and then over a 20-year period makes equal distribution internally to the insurance carrier and funds the life insurance.
  9. Important Documents for Long-Term Care Planning. Contact us to ask one of our experienced estate planning attorneys about a power of attorney for health care and financial power of attorney, as well as an advance directive or living will.
  10. Using Veterans Benefits to Pay for Long-Term Care. The VA offers a special pension: the Aid and Attendance (A&A) Benefit. This is a “pension benefit” and is not dependent upon service-related injuries for compensation.

Reference: WGN (2022) “10 Crucial Things to Know about Long-Term Care“

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How Do You Provide Financial Help for a Special Needs Child and Retirement Too? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

For parents of children with disabilities, the challenges of preparing for retirement and for their child’s future are far higher than for families with healthy, high-functioning adults. Planning for your own retirement, while needing to secure the stability and basic needs of a child who will be a dependent forever often feels impossible, according to the recent article “Planning for Your Retirement, and for a Child’s Special Needs, All at Once” from The New York Times.

Even under the best of circumstances, where there’s plenty of money available and many hands to help, caring for an adult child with special needs is emotionally and physically challenging. As parents age, they have to address their own needs plus the needs of their adult dependent. Who will provide safe and comfortable housing and care for them when their parents no longer can?

Understanding the entire picture can be difficult, even for parents with the best of intentions. First, they need to understand how their retirement planning must be different than other families. Their investments need to be multi-generational to last not just for their lifetimes, but for their child’s lifetime. They can’t be too conservative because they need long-term growth.

In addition, special needs parents need to keep a certain amount of funds liquid and easily accessible, for times when their child needs a new piece of expensive equipment immediately.

One of the parents will often leave the workforce to provide care or take a lower paying position to be more available for care. This creates a double hit; the household budget is reduced at the same time its strained by costs not covered by benefits or insurance. Paying for gas to drive to therapy appointments and day programs, buying supplies not covered by insurance, like adult diapers, waterproof bedding, compression garments to promote circulation, specialized diets, etc. adds up quickly.

Even with public health assistance, finding affordable housing is not easy. One adult may need supervised care in a group home, while others may need in-home care. However, the family home may need to be modified to accommodate their physical disabilities. With wait times lasting several years, many families feel they have no choice but to keep their family member at home.

Another challenge: if the parents wanted to downsize to a smaller house or move to a state where housing costs are lower, they may not be able to do so. Most of the public benefits available to special needs people are administered through Medicaid at the state level. Moving to a state with a lower cost of housing may also mean losing access to the disabled individuals’ benefits or being placed at the end of the waiting list for services in a new state.

For disabled individuals, maintaining eligibility is a key issue. Family members who name a disabled individual as a beneficiary don’t understand how they are jeopardizing their ability to access public benefits. Any money intended for a disabled person must be held in a specialized financial instrument, such as a special needs trust.

The money in a special needs trust (SNT) may be used for quality-of-life enhancements like a cellphone, computer, better food, care providers, rent and utilities among other qualified expenses.

There are two main categories of SNTs: first party trusts, created with assets belonging to the individual. Any money in this trust must go to reimburse the state for the cost of their care. Another is a third-party special needs trust, established and funded by someone else for the benefit of the disabled individual. These are typically funded by parent’s life insurance proceeds and second-to-die life insurance policies. Both parents are covered under it, and the policy pays out after the second spouse dies, providing a more affordable option than insuring both parents separately.

Contact us to schedule a time to speak with one of our experienced estate planning attorneys to develop a plan for your special needs child’s future as well as for your retirement.

Reference: The New York Times (Aug. 27, 2022) “Planning for Your Retirement, and for a Child’s Special Needs, All at Once”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What Can Happen When You are Asked to Sign a Nursing Home Agreement? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

The services provided by a skilled nursing facility are very important. They are also very expensive. The person who arrives at an elder law office with a bill from a nursing home for $19,400—$646.66 per day—is often the same person who signed an electronic version of an admissions form without knowing what would happen.

This is one of many ways people are held responsible for loved ones’ nursing home bills, according to the recent article “Should you sign a nursing home admission agreement?” from The Bristol Press. The stress of having a loved one admitted to a nursing home is an overwhelming experience, usually taking place at the same time you’re managing all the details, just when someone from the nursing home very politely and usually firmly tells you “these papers” must be signed immediately.

It’s important not to rush in this situation, because the agreement could contain illegal or misleading provisions. Try not to sign the agreement until after the resident has moved into the facility, when you may have more leverage. However, even if you have to sign the agreement before the resident moves in, have the agreement reviewed by an experienced elder law attorney and request that any illegal or unfair terms be deleted. Don’t take the nursing home’s word that they cannot do so.

Two terms to pay close attention to:

Responsible Party. The nursing home may try to get you to sign the agreement as the “responsible party.” Don’t do it. Nursing homes are legally prohibited from requiring third parties to guarantee payment of nursing home bills. However, there are some who try to get family members to voluntarily agree.

If at all possible, the resident should sign the agreement themselves. If the resident is incapacitated, you may sign but must be clear you are signing as the resident’s agent. Read carefully for terms like “guarantor,” “financial agent,” or “responsible party.” Before signing, you can cross out any terms indicating you are responsible for payment and clearly indicate you are only agreeing to use the resident’s income and resources to pay and not your own.

Arbitration Provisions: Many nursing home agreements contain provisions stating that all disputes regarding the resident’s care will be decided through arbitration and remove the ability to take the nursing home to court. This is not an illegal provision, although many feel it should be. Most people do not know they cannot be required to sign an arbitration provision. Cross out any language regarding arbitration before signing the agreement.

Private Pay Requirement. It is illegal for the nursing home to require a Medicare or Medicaid recipient to pay the private rate for a period of time, nor may the nursing home require a resident to affirm whether they are not eligible for Medicare or Medicaid.

Eviction Procedures: It is illegal for a nursing home to evict a resident for any reason other than the facility cannot meet the resident’s needs, the resident’s health has improved, the resident is endangering other residents, the resident has not paid, or the nursing home is closing.

Speak with an elder law attorney before facing the complexity of a nursing home admission agreement. The patient and their loved ones have rights to be protected.

Reference: The Bristol Press (Aug. 15, 2022) “Should you sign a nursing home admission agreement?”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Planning for Long Term Care Is Important – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Elder law attorneys have far too many stories of people who fail to plan, plan incorrectly or incompletely, or plan to fail by doing nothing at all, as described in the article “Elder Care: People in a pickle” from The Sentinel. Here’s a sad story.

A woman calls the elder law office because her husband fell at home—a common occurrence among the elderly. He was hospitalized and is now receiving rehabilitation in a nursing home. The treating physician recommends that the husband remain in the nursing home because he has significant limitations and his wife, who has her own medical issues, isn’t physically able to care for him.

The wife agrees. However, she has a host of challenges to overcome that were never addressed. The husband took care of all of the finances, for decades telling his wife not to worry. Now, she has no idea what their resources are. Can they afford to pay for his nursing home care? She doesn’t know. Nor does she have the authority to access their accounts, because there are accounts in her husband’s name only and she does not have access to them.

Her husband’s insistence of being the only one in control of their finances has put her in a terrible predicament. Without the estate planning documents to give her access to everything, including his own accounts, she can’t act. Can he now sign a Power of Attorney? Maybe—but maybe not, if it can be shown he lacks capacity.

If the couple cannot pay the nursing home bill, they have given their children a problem, since they live in Pennsylvania, where the state’s filial support law allows the nursing home to sue one or more of the children for the cost of their parent’s care. (This law varies by state, so check with a local elder lawyer to see if it could impact your family). Even if the wife knew about the family’s finances and could apply for public benefits, in this case his eligibility would be denied, as they had purchased a home for one of their children within five years of his being moved to the nursing home. Medicaid has a five-year look back period, and any large transfers or purchases would make the husband ineligible for five years.

If this sounds like a financial, legal and emotional mess, it’s a fair assessment.

Unexpected events happen, and putting off planning for them, or one spouse insisting “I’ve got this” when truly they don’t, takes a big impact on the future for spouses and family members. All of the decisions we make, or fail to make, can have major impacts on the future for our loved ones.

Other situations familiar to elder lawyers: a parent naming two children as co-agents for power of attorney. When she began showing symptoms of dementia, the two children disagreed on her care and ended up in court.

A father has guardianship for a disabled adult son. He promised the son he’d always be able to live in the family home. The father becomes ill and must move into a nursing home. Neither one is able to manage their own personal finances, and no financial or practical arrangements were made to fulfill the promise to the son.

No one expects to have these problems, but even the most loving families find themselves snarled in legal battles because of poor planning. Careful planning may not reduce the messy events of life, but it can reduce the stress and expenses. By choosing to exert some control over who can help you with decisions and what plans are in place for the future, you can leave a legacy of caring.  Contact us and schedule a time to begin your planning with one of our experienced estate planning attorneys.

Reference: The Sentinel (Aug. 19, 2022) “Elder Care: People in a pickle”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Will Making a Gift Conflict with Medicaid? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

People usually make gifts for three reasons—because they enjoy giving gifts, because they want to protect assets, or minimize tax liability. However, gifting in one’s elder years can have expensive and unintended consequences, as reported in the article “IRS standards for gifting differ from Medicaid” from The News-Enterprise.

The IRS gift tax becomes expensive, if gifts are large. However, each individual has a lifetime gift exemption and, as of this writing, it is $12.06 million, which is historically high. A married couple may make a gift of $24.12 million. Most people don’t get anywhere near these levels. Those who do are advised to do estate and tax planning to protect their assets.

The current lifetime gift tax exemption is scheduled to drop to $5.49 million per person after 2025, unless Congress extends the higher exemption, which seems unlikely.

The IRS also allows an annual exemption. For 2022, the annual exemption is $16,000 per person. Anyone can gift up to $16,000 per person and to multiple people, without reducing their lifetime exemption.

People often confuse the IRS annual exclusion with Medicaid requirements for eligibility. IRS gift tax rules are totally different from Medicaid rules.

Medicaid does not offer an annual gift exclusion. Medicaid penalizes any gift made within 60 months before applying to Medicaid, unless there has been a specific exception.

For Medicaid purposes, gifts include outright gifts to individuals, selling property for less than fair market value, transferring assets to a trust, or giving away partial interests.

The Veterans Administration may also penalize gifts made within 36 months before applying for certain VA programs based on eligibility.

Gifting can have serious capital gains tax consequences. Gifts of real estate property to another person are given with the giver’s tax basis. When real property is inherited, the property is received with a new basis of fair market value.

For gifting high value assets, the difference in tax basis can lead to either a big tax bill or big tax savings. Let’s say someone paid $50,000 for land 40 years ago, and today the land is worth $650,000. The appreciation of the property is $600,000. If the property is gifted while the owner is alive, the recipient has a $50,000 tax basis. When the recipient sells the property, they will have to pay a capital gains tax based on the $50,000.

If the property was inherited, the tax would be either nothing or next to nothing.

Asset protection for Medicaid is complicated and requires the experience and knowledge of an elder law attorney. What worked for your neighbor may not work for you, as we don’t always know all the details of someone else’s situation.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (Aug. 6, 2022) “IRS standards for gifting differ from Medicaid”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Medicaid Crisis Plans for Long Term Care Costs – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

To the estate planning attorney, the situation is known as “crisis planning.” It almost always involves two things happening at once: the immediate need for additional healthcare and for a family’s assets to be protected. The end goal of crisis planning is to protect assets for both spouses, while ensuring that the sick spouse receives the care they need, as explained in the article “Crisis planning for couples focuses on asset protection” from The News-Enterprise.

What is Medicaid Crisis Planning?

Crisis planning for married couples requires a three-step process. First, does the spouse in crisis have the documents in place to allow another person to act on their behalf? This includes a financial power of attorney and a healthcare power of attorney.

Powers of Attorney need to be checked to ensure that they include specific powers needed to take action on the person’s behalf. These documents are “state specific,” meaning each state has laws determining what the POA must contain and how it must be prepared. Crisis planning requires a POA providing a broad set of powers, so agents can access and change documents like deeds, bank and investment accounts.

Once the documents and POAs are in hand, the next step is to get a detailed breakdown of the couple’s financial position and the cost of care. This becomes easier if the couple is organized and has information readily available for each income stream and asset.

What Information Will the Agent Need?

The agent must find several different types of financial documents. Proof of income for each income stream is needed. The actual proof of income will show taxes withdrawn or other deductions taken from income, such as health insurance.

The agent will also need access to several months of statements for each account, including bank statements, investment accounts, retirement accounts and deeds and titles for property. Proof of other assets, including insurance policies, burial plot deeds and other assets must also be included.

Some types of income and assets are countable, and some are non-countable. However, the non-countable income and assets may need to be considered, so the estate planning attorney will need to have all the information.

Medicaid Resource Assessment Request

Step three is to determine eligibility for programs and make the necessary applications. This will depend on the type of care needed. However, a typical crisis case is for nursing home care, which almost always means Medicaid eligibility. All income and assets are reported to Medicaid through a Resource Assessment request. The Medicaid office creates a breakdown of what will be counted against the applicant.

The remaining amount is what must be “spent down” for a person to be eligible for Medicaid coverage.

The most common way to do this is through a Medicaid Annuity. This annuity takes the spend down amount and returns the full amount as income to the spouse at home, effectively preserving the couple’s assets.

Crisis planning is stressful but does not have to be hopeless. By working with an experienced estate planning attorney and providing documentation as quickly as possible, health care needs can be met without the well spouse being impoverished.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (July 23, 2022) “Crisis planning for couples focuses on asset protection”

 

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Does a Supplemental Needs Trust have an Impact on Government Benefits? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Supplemental Needs Trusts allow disabled individuals to retain inheritances or gifts without eliminating or reducing government benefits, like Medicaid or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). There are cases where the individual is vulnerable to exploitation or unable to manage their own finances and using an SNT allows them to receive additional funds to pay for things not covered by their benefits.

Having an experienced estate planning attorney properly create the SNT is critical to preserving the individual’s benefits, according to a recent article titled “Protecting Government Benefits using Supplemental Needs Trusts” from Mondaq.

Disabled individuals who receive SSI must be careful, since the rules about assets from SSI are far more restrictive then if the person only received Medicaid or Social Security Disability and Medicaid.

The trustee of an SNT makes distributions to third parties like personal care items, transportation (including buying a car), entertainment, technology purchases, payment of rent and medical or therapeutic equipment. Payment of rent or even ownership of a home may be paid for by the trustee.

The SNT may not make cash distributions to the beneficiary. Payment for any items or services must be made directly to the service provider, retailers, or other entity, for benefit of the individual. Not following this rule could lead to the SNT becoming invalid.

SNTs may be funded using the disabled person’s own funds or by a third party for their benefit. If the SNT is funded using the person’s own funds, it is called a “Self-Settled SNT.” This is a useful tool if the disabled person inherits money, receives a court settlement or owned assets before becoming disabled.

If someone other than the disabled person funds the SNT, it is known as a “Third-Party SNT.” These are most commonly created as part of an estate plan to protect a family member and ensure they have supplementary funds as needed and to preserve assets for other family members when the disabled individual dies.

The most important distinction between a Self-Settled SNT and a Third-Party SNT is a Self-Settled SNT must contain a provision to direct the trust to pay back the state’s Medicaid agency for any assistance provided. This is known as a “Payback Provision.”

The Third-Party SNT is not required to contain this provision and any assets remaining in the trust at the time of the disabled person’s death may be passed on to residual beneficiaries.

Many estate planning attorneys use a “standby” SNT as part of their planning, so their loved ones may be protected, in case an unexpected event occurs and a family member becomes disabled.

References: Mondaq (May 27, 2022) “Protecting Government Benefits using Supplemental Needs Trusts”

 

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Must I Sell Parent’s Home if They Move to a Nursing Facility? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

If a parent is transferring to a nursing home, you may ask if her home must be sold.

It is common in a parent’s later years to have the parent and an adult child on the deed, with a line of credit on the house. As a result, there is very little equity.

Seniors Matter’s recent article entitled “If my mom moves to a nursing home, does her home need to be sold?” says that if your mother has assets in her name, but not enough resources to pay for an extended nursing home stay, this can add another level of complexity.

If your mother has long-term care insurance or a life insurance policy with a nursing home rider, these can help cover the costs.

However, if your mom will rely on state aid, through Medicaid, she will need to qualify for coverage based on her income and assets.

Medicaid income and asset limits are low—and vary by state. Homes are usually excluded from the asset limits for qualification purposes. That is because most states’ Medicaid programs will not count a nursing home resident’s home as an asset when calculating an applicant’s eligibility for Medicaid, provided the resident intends to return home

However, a home may come into play later on because states eventually attempt to recover their costs of providing care. If a parent stays a year-and-a-half in a nursing home—the typical stay for women— when her home is sold, the state will make a claim for a share of the home’s sales proceeds.

Many seniors use an irrevocable trust to avoid this “asset recovery.”

Trusts can be expensive to create and require the help of an experienced elder law attorney. As a result, in some cases, this may not be an option. If there is not enough equity left after the sale, some states also pursue other assets, such as bank accounts, to satisfy their nursing home expense claims.

An adult child selling the home right before the parent goes into a nursing home would also not avoid the state trying to recover its costs. This is because Medicaid has a look-back period for asset transfers occurring within five years.

There are some exceptions. For example, if an adult child lived with their parent in the house as her caregiver prior to her being placed in a nursing home. However, there are other requirements.

Talk to an elder law attorney on the best way to go, based on state law and other specific factors.

Reference: Seniors Matter (Feb. 25, 2022) “If my mom moves to a nursing home, does her home need to be sold?”

 

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys