Should We Include Our Children in Our Charitable Giving Plans? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Transferring wealth to the next generation is a major part of estate planning, but few people discuss their philanthropic goals with their heirs.

CNBC’s recent article, “Don’t expect Mom and Dad to clue you in on your inheritance,” says that 8 out of 10 financial advisors said that “some” or “hardly any” of their clients involve the next generation in family philanthropy, according to a recent survey from Key Private Bank.

It would great for the older generation to get their children involved in the process because they frequently don’t see eye to eye on philanthropic causes. As a result, it’s rare for a person to get their children and grandchildren involved in philanthropy. That’s one of the biggest mistakes parents make when they think of wealth transfer planning and preparing their children to be responsible heirs.

The IRS will allow you to transfer up to $11.4 million ($22.8 million if you’re married) to your heirs, either in gifts during your lifetime or in bequests at death, without the 40% estate and gift tax. Remember that charitable bequests are deductible, lower your gross estate and reduce the estate tax bill.

Donor Advised Funds are tax-advantaged accounts that people can open at a brokerage firm and fund with cash, securities and other assets. It’s important to establish the charitable vehicle, like a donor advised fund, during your lifetime.

It’s best to be open about your own values and the causes you want to support.

Children would like to participate in their inheritance beyond the financial assets. They also should understand what values were important for Mom and Dad.

Listen to your children and grandchildren because younger generations bring a different view to the charitable giving conversation. Getting them involved early will also prepare them to be good stewards.

One more thing: try not to rule from the throne. As your heirs get older and devote themselves to different causes, try to step back. Let them drive the charitable effort. Give them guidance and support.

Reference: CNBC (September 18, 2019) “Don’t expect Mom and Dad to clue you in on your inheritance”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Who Should I Choose as My Trustee? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

The Wilmington Business Journal’s recent article, “Duties of A Trustee: Choose Wisely,” explains that there are several qualifications to consider when choosing a trustee.

Here are some of the more important ones:

  • Administrative skill and knowledge. The trustee must perform many tasks, like collecting assets, collection, reinvestment and distribution of income, document interpretation and bill paying, to name a few.
  • Investment expertise. A trustee is required to develop an investment program that meets the requirements of all the trust beneficiaries. At the same time, she must comply with the instructions in the trust document.
  • Tax and accounting capabilities. A trustee has to keep detailed, accurate records, to be able to submit timely reports to the trust beneficiaries, the probate court and the IRS.
  • Relationship skills. The trustee should be able to develop an honest relationship with both the creator of the trust and the beneficiaries.
  • Probably the most important qualification for a trustee is to uphold her fiduciary duty. She must be loyal and treat each trust beneficiary fairly and impartially.

People generally assume that a friend or relative is the best choice to designate as trustee. However, the question to be asked is, “Will an individual meet all the qualifications I require my trustee to perform?”

In many instances, a friend or relative isn’t in a position to carry out the duties necessary to be an effective trustee. A trust company is another option.

Choosing the right trustee is a critical decision. Assuming the role of trustee is a big responsibility. Take the time to think about this, before making that commitment.

Getting help from an experienced estate planning attorney can assist you in the estate planning process.

Reference: Wilmington Business Journal (September 13, 2019) “Duties of A Trustee: Choose Wisely”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How Do I Deed My Home into a Trust? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Say that a husband used his inheritance to purchase the family home outright. The wife signed a quitclaim deed to him to put the property into his living trust with the condition that if he died before his wife, she could live in the home until her death.

However, a common issue is that the husband or the creator of the trust never signed the living trust. So what would happen to the property if the husband were to die before the wife?

This can be complicated if the couple lives out-of-state and it’s a second marriage for each of the spouses. They both also have adult children from prior marriages.

The Herald Tribune’s recent article, “Home ownership complications need guidance from estate planning attorney,” says that in this situation it’s important to know if the deed was to the husband personally or to his living trust. If the wife quitclaimed the home to her husband personally, he then owns her share of the home, subject to any marital interests she may still have in the home. However, if the wife quitclaimed the home to his living trust, and the trust was never created, the deed may be invalid. The wife may still own the husband’s interest in the home.

It’s common for a couple to own the home as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. This would have meant that if the wife died, her husband would own the entire property automatically. If he died, she’d own the entire home automatically. She then signed a quitclaim deed over to him or his trust.

First, the wife should see if the deed was even filed or recorded. If it wasn’t recorded or filed, she could simply destroy the document and keep the status of the title as it was. However, if the document was recorded and she transferred ownership to her husband, he would be the sole owner of the home, subject to her marital rights under state law.

If the trust doesn’t exist, her quitclaim deed transfer to an entity that doesn’t exist would create a situation, where she could claim that she still owned her interest in the home. However, the home may now be owned by the spouses as tenants in common, rather than joint tenants with rights of survivorship.

To complicate things further, if the husband now owns the home and the wife has marital rights in the home, upon his death, she may still be entitled to a share of the home under her husband’s will, if he has one, or by the laws of intestacy. However, the husband’s children would also own a share of his share of the home. At that point, the wife would co-own the home with his children.

You can see how crazy this can get. It’s best to seek the advice of a qualified estate planning attorney to guide you through the process and make sure that the proper documents get signed and filed or recorded.

Reference: The (Sarasota, FL) Herald Tribune (September 8, 2019) “Home ownership complications need guidance from estate planning attorney”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Does a Beneficiary of an Estate Need to Live in the U.S.? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

When a person dies without a will, the distribution of his or her estate assets is governed by the state’s intestacy statute.

All states have laws that instruct the court on how to disburse the intestate decedent’s property, usually according to how close in relationship they are to the person who passed away.

A recent nj.com article responded to the following question: “My ex’s new wife isn’t a citizen. Does she get an inheritance?” The article explains that under the intestacy laws of New Jersey, for example, if the deceased had children who aren’t the children of the surviving spouse, the surviving spouse is entitled to the first 25% of the estate but not less than $50,000 nor more than $200,000, plus one-half of the balance of the estate.

Also, under New Jersey law, aliens or those who are not citizens of the United States are eligible to inherit assets.

In California, if you die with children but no spouse, the children inherit everything. If you have a spouse but no children, parents, siblings, or nieces or nephews, the spouse inherits everything. If you have parents but no children, spouse, or siblings, your parents inherit everything. If you have siblings but no children, spouse, or parents, those siblings inherit everything.

Also in California, if you’re married and you die without a will, what property your spouse will receive is based in part on how the two of you owned your property. Was it separate property or community property? California is a community property state, so your spouse will inherit your half of the community property.

In that case, an ex-husband’s wife who lives in and is a citizen of the Philippines doesn’t need to be physically present in the state to inherit assets from her husband.

If the deceased owned property in the Philippines, the distribution of those assets would be according to the laws of that country.

Reference: nj.com (August 28, 2019) “My ex’s new wife isn’t a citizen. Does she get an inheritance?”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

Don’t Forget to Update Your Estate Plan – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

There are some people who sign their will once in their life and never change it. They may have executed their estate plan late in life or after they were diagnosed with a serious disease.

However, even if your family life and finances are pretty basic, there are still changes in the law that you may need to incorporate into your estate plan.  Some of the people that you named in your will could also have died or moved away.

Forbes’ recent article, “Why You Should Change Your Will Now,” warns us that if you’ve taken the “one and done” approach to your estate plan, think again. In addition to the reasons already mentioned, your assets may have changed dramatically since you signed your will. The plan you put in place years ago may not have considered new federal and state estate taxes. Now that you’ve accumulated significant wealth that will be passed on to your children, you might need to review your plans for that wealth for your children.

You may want to include grandchildren to help pay for their college education.

It is also not uncommon for parents to want to protect their children from themselves. This can be because of addiction issues or a lack of financial literacy. If that’s an issue, some parents elect to hold monies in trust for adult children as a way to ensure that the funds will be there throughout the child’s lifetime.

A person’s estate plan should grow with them over time. An estate plan for a twenty-something may be very basic, but a newly-married couple will want to include provisions for their spouse. Parents need to think about providing for and protecting their children. Adult children have another set of concerns and you need prepare for the possibility of divorcing spouses, poor life choices, addiction issues and just poor money management. There are many stages in life when you may need to readjust the provisions for your children in your estate planning documents.

If you haven’t looked at your will in a while, do it now.

Reference: Forbes (August 27, 2019) “Why You Should Change Your Will Now”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

How Do I Get an Executor to Sell My Mom’s Home? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

It’s not uncommon for a parent to leave his or her home to their children in equal shares.

Let’s assume that two sisters are both equal beneficiaries of their mother’s estate in New Jersey. Each adult child has retained an attorney. The executor, who’s a family friend, is moving slowly with the probate process, and it’s been more than a year of waiting. The executor of estate is the individual who is specifically designated in the deceased’s will to manage the estate.

In this case, the glacier-like progress of the executor is causing a strain on the sisters’ relationship. This results in the sisters fighting over the estate. One sister is in no hurry to sell the house, and the other feels frustrated and may have to just give her everything and walk away to save her sanity.

nj.com’s recent article on this topic asks “My mom’s executor won’t sell the house. What can I do about it?” The article says that these sisters probably tried to negotiate a resolution. However, there’s no reason to think the only way to resolve this is for you to “give her everything and walk away.”

The executor should sell the home and distribute the proceeds to the sisters.

If one of the children, her attorney, or the executor object to the sale of the home, a judge may need to intervene.

If there’s no issue, and the executor won’t act, a beneficiary can apply to the court to remove the executor. The judge may then name the two sisters as co-executors, so they can sell the home.

Although there would be legal fees and costs to go to court to get some action, if the executor won’t move, there may not be any other choice.

In addition, the sisters could ask the judge to decrease any executor commission that would be owed to the original slow-moving executor to cover the legal fees, if the judge agrees that the executor was acting improperly.

Reference: nj.com (August 10, 2019) “My mom’s executor won’t sell the house. What can I do about it?”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What Does a Probate Attorney Really Do? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

If you’ve recently experienced the death of a loved one, you may have spent a lot of time and money dealing with their estate and trying to get their assets out of probate.

KAKE.com’s recent article, “Do I Need to Hire a Probate Lawyer?: The Top Signs You Should Lawyer Up” says that trying to do this on your own can often be time-consuming and expensive. That’s why it’s smart to have a probate lawyer working with you.

A probate or estate planning lawyer is one who specializes in issues related to a deceased person’s estate. They have a broad range of responsibilities, which includes the following:

  • Guiding people through the probate process;
  • Advising the beneficiaries of an estate;
  • Representing beneficiaries if they become involved in lawsuits related to the estate; and
  • Helping with challenges to the validity of the deceased’s will.

If you’re unsure about hiring a lawyer, consider whether you’re dealing with any of these issues in your case:

A Will Contest. This is when another beneficiary challenges the will. If someone contests the will, it will drag out the process and could put you at risk of losing what your loved one wanted for you to have.

Divided Assets. When split assets are part of an estate, things get complicated, especially when you have intangible assets. To avoid trouble, hire a lawyer who can help navigate the division of these assets and make certain that everything is handled in a fair manner.

An Estate Doesn’t Qualify for the Simple Probate Process. Probate can be extremely complicated. Depending on the size of the estate, it may qualify for simpler procedures that are completed relatively quickly. If this isn’t the case for the estate at issue, you should get a probate attorney to help you.

There’s Considerable Debt. If your loved one died with many debts, the estate will need to be used to pay those off. This can be tricky to manage on your own. An experienced attorney will help you make sure everything gets paid off and can negotiate debts to ensure you and the other beneficiaries receive as much from the estate as possible.

There’s Estate Tax Due. While most estates don’t have to pay any federal taxes, some states have their own estate taxes that apply to estates worth $1 million or more. It’s not an easy process, so it’s a good idea to work with an experienced estate planning attorney.

There’s a Business in the Estate. You need to ask an attorney to you sort this out because this will include the process of appraising, managing and selling a business of the deceased owner.

If any of these situations apply to you, hire an attorney with the necessary qualifications to deal with estates and the probate process.

Reference: KAKE.com (August 9, 2019) “Do I Need to Hire a Probate Lawyer?: The Top Signs You Should Lawyer Up”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What Is a Bypass Trust? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

Creating an estate plan is an essential part of managing wealth. This is especially true if you’re married and want to leave assets to your spouse. Understanding how a bypass trust works will help your planning, says KAKE.com’s recent article, “How a Bypass Trust Works in an Estate Plan.”

A bypass trust, or AB trust, is a legal vehicle that permits married couples to avoid estate tax on certain assets when one spouse dies. When that happens, the estate’s assets are split into two separate trusts. The first part is the marital trust, or “A” trust, and the other is a bypass, family, or “B” trust. The marital trust is a revocable trust that belongs to the surviving spouse. A revocable trust has terms that can be changed by the individual who created it. The family or “B” trust is irrevocable, meaning its terms can’t be changed.

When the first spouse dies, his or her share of the estate goes into the family or B trust. The surviving spouse doesn’t own those assets but can access the trust during their lifetime and receive income from it. The part of the estate that doesn’t go into the B trust, is placed into the A or marital trust. The surviving spouse has total control over this part of the trust. In addition, the surviving spouse can be the trustee of a bypass trust or designate another person as the trustee. It is the trustee’s task to make sure that assets from the couple’s estate are divided appropriately into each part of the trust. The trustee also coordinates asset management as instructed by the trust.

This type of trust can minimize estate taxes for married couples who have significant wealth. For the family or B part of the trust, assets up to an annual exemption limit aren’t subject to federal estate tax. In 2019, the limit is $11.4 million or $22.8 million for married couples. If assets in the B trust don’t exceed that amount, they wouldn’t be subject to federal estate tax.

Holding assets in a bypass trust lets the surviving spouse avoid probate. Any assets held in a bypass or other type of trust aren’t subject to probate.

Work with an estate planning attorney to create a bypass trust. A bypass trust for your estate plan will depend on the value of your estate as well as the amount of estate tax you want your spouse or heirs to pay when you die.

Reference: KAKE.com (August 13, 2019) “How a Bypass Trust Works in an Estate Plan”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

What are Some Lifetime Gift Strategies that I Can Consider? – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning

There are a number of strategies that can help preserve your assets, promote the transfer of wealth, and lessen the tax burden on you and your estate. Forbes’s published an article “5 Lifetime Gift Strategies For You And Your Family To Consider” that discusses five frequently-used lifetime gifting strategies to consider, if you have significant wealth to transfer to future generations.

A grantor retained annuity trust (GRAT) is an irrevocable trust that can be a good choice if you want to transfer hard-to-value assets. A GRAT also lets you keep your income stream, divide property interests and make discounted gifts to future generations. With a GRAT, the grantor transfers assets to a trust but maintains a right to an annual income stream, or annuity payment, for a specific period of time. The income stream’s value is deducted from the value of the transferred assets when determining the gift’s full taxable value. Anything left in the GRAT after the annuity period expires, is given to the trust’s beneficiaries without any more gift or estate taxes. However, if the grantor dies before the end of the trust term, the whole value of the trust will be included in the taxable estate (like the trust had never been created). Therefore, you can see how important it can be to carefully choose the term of the trust, so the grantor is likely to live beyond its termination.

A defective grantor trust strategy is one way to benefit from the differences in income and transfer-tax treatments of irrevocable trusts. This can let you transfer the anticipated appreciation of your assets at a reduced gift-tax cost. Here, the grantor transfers property to a trust in exchange for a note that carries a market rate of interest and a balloon payment at the end of the note’s term. In most cases, the grantor and trust are treated as the same entity for income tax purposes, but they are considered separate for transfer tax purposes. This discrepancy allows the grantor to affect a sale to the trust without any capital gain.

Family limited liability entities are complex strategies that can provide many benefits to high net worth families with personal, business and investment assets. They’re flexible, so it makes them particularly attractive, because their governing documents can be changed as family dynamics and family business structures evolve. These entities are frequently used to help families consolidate investments, share income with family members in lower tax brackets, shield assets from lawsuits and create a long-term estate plan. Speak with an estate planning attorney to see if this strategy makes sense for your situation.

A lifetime credit shelter trust can be a wise vehicle if you want to leverage the increased lifetime gift-tax exemption amount but aren’t yet ready to transfer significant assets. With this trust, the grantor makes a gift to the trust for the benefit of his or her spouse and other family members. Because of the spouse’s rights to the assets in the trust as a beneficiary, the grantor also maintains his or her access indirectly. You can allocate your lifetime exemption while the gifted assets, including any appreciation, stay outside your estate for estate tax purposes. You and your spouse can create lifetime credit shelter trusts, but they can’t be identical.

Another strategy is making an intra-family loan. The tax code lets you make loans to family members at lower rates than commercial lenders, without the loan being considered a gift. You can help your family members financially without incurring more gift tax. The IRS requires that a bona fide creditor relationship with a minimum interest rate be created. This can be a good way to transfer wealth, if the borrowed assets are invested and earn a stronger rate of return than the interest rate on the loan.  The interest must also be paid within the family.

Reference: Forbes (August 5, 2019) “5 Lifetime Gift Strategies For You And Your Family To Consider”

Sims & Campbell, LLC – Annapolis and Towson Estate Planning Attorneys

For Immediate Release

Contact: Jane Frankel Sims

410-828-7775

Contact: Frank Campbell

410-263-1667

Sims & Campbell Estates and Trusts

Frankel Sims Law and Holden & Campbell
Merge to Form Sims & Campbell

Firm will offer comprehensive Trusts & Estates services through offices in Towson and Annapolis

TOWSON, Md. (April 26,2019)  Frankel Sims Law and Holden & Campbell have jointly announced the merger of their firms to create a boutique Trusts & Estates law firm providing comprehensive services in the fields of Estate Planning, Estate Administration, Trust Administration and Charitable Giving. The combined firm will be named Sims & Campbell and have offices in Towson, Md. and Annapolis, Md.  Jane Frankel Sims and Frank Campbell will lead and hold equal ownership stakes in the firm.

Sims & Campbell will have 9 attorneys and 15 legal professionals that handle every facet of estate and wealth transfer planning, including wills, revocable living trusts, irrevocable trusts, estate and gift tax advice, and charitable giving strategies.  The firm will focus solely on Trusts & Estates but will serve a wide range of clients, from young families with modest resources to ultra-high net worth individuals.  This allows clients to remain with the firm as their level of wealth and the complexity of related estate and tax implications change over time. 

“By joining forces, we have expanded our footprint to conveniently serve clients in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia” said Jane Frankel Sims.  We are seeing some of the greatest wealth transfer in our country’s history, and we want to continue to be on the leading edge of helping our clients maintain and enhance their family’s wealth.  In addition, we aim to serve our clients for years to come, and the new firm structure will allow Sims & Campbell to thrive even after Frank and I have retired.”    

“Jane and I have always admired each other’s firms and recognized the need to provide even greater depth and breadth of focused expertise to help families amass and protect their wealth from generation to generation,” said Frank Campbell.  “Now we have even greater capabilities to make a real difference for our clients.” 

The Sims & Campbell Towson office is located at 500 York Road, on the corner of York Road and Pennsylvania Avenue in the heart of Towson.  The Annapolis office is currently located at 716 Melvin Avenue, and is moving to 181 Truman Parkway in August, 2019.  For more information, visit www.simscampbell.law.